Year: 2017

Festive Food

Cooking for the festive season should be all about fun! It should be fun to cook, fun to look to at and fun to eat. Have yourself a tasty little Christmas with these four recipes which encapsulate fun and festivity, colour and cheerfulness. Cranberry and Pomegranate Pavlova – a new twist to an old classic mixing mascarpone with cream and decorating with sprigs of rosemary. Yum! Find the recipe (and gorgeous photos) at Gastro Senses. Lady Bug Caprese Salad – turn the humble cherry tomato, a sliver of mozzarella, a basil leave and an olive into something else entirely. How cute are they? See more food art at Viral Nova. Christmas Tree Vegetable Platter – veges have never looked so good! Boost your vitamins this Christmas with this easy-to-make raw vegetable platter and dipping sauce. Get the recipe at Betty Croker. White Chocolate Dipped Cherries – tart up your cherries with some melted chocolate and silver balls. They look fantastic and best of all no stoning is required! Found at Four Generations One Roof.  

Doggie Knits | Wow the Poocherazzi

Is your hound on-trend or are you too embarrassed to be seen in public with your four-legged friend in case of stalking poocherazzi? Unless you’re knitting for a Saint Bernard, it’s a relatively inexpensive exercise producing a garment for your loved one. Here are some stylish knits to preserve the celebrity status of your canine fashionista. Pretty as a powderpuff, this stocking stitch pullover with matching hat (along with a multitude of variations) was available on eBay when I first sourced it but has since disappeared – perhaps due to overwhelmingly popularity. Adorable, but kind of weird to have your furball surpass you in cuteness. Strike a pose, swag in colour and slimline fit, this garment is cleverly designed with an aerated under passage to allow sensational access for those last minute calls of nature. Take a leaf, humans. Image courtesy of Pinterest. The snoods have it. Hail the Prince of Wales who made Fair Isle tank tops fashionable in the 1920s. Named after a tiny island off the Scottish coastline that forms part of the Shetland …

Interview: Sophie Carnell | Jeweller and Artist

Sophie Carnell is a jewellery maker and artist living and working on Bruny Island, Tasmania, Asutralia who only embarked on a Fine Arts degree in her late thirties and silver smithing fairly recently. She’s the perfect example of how it’s never too late to start a creative practice! Fascinated by history, the landscape and our connection with the environment, Sophie explores these ideas, often using recycled, upcycled and collected materials in her work that combines jewellery and art and art with jewellery. Read on to learn more … Please introduce yourself. Tell us about your background and how you’ve got to where you are today. I was born in England and lived there until I was twenty, growing up in the picturesque Cotswolds and rambling free around the countryside as a child. I also lived on a little island off the South West Coast of Ireland. That forever instilled in my heart a love of storm blue oceans, lowering skies, dizzying clifftops and wild coastlines. When I came to Australia I lived for ten years …

Repurposed Military-ware

The ultimate in upcycling and repurposing is turning old military items and war-time materials into functional and wearable peacetime pieces. Who’d have thought Jerry Cans, unexploded bombs, shell casings and disarmed nuclear weapon systems could be anything other than unwanted waste? Danish Fuel Danish Fuel collects original World War Two Jerry Cans from military surplus stock houses and with a lot of elbow grease breathes new life into them to create Bar Cabinets, First Aid Stations, Bathroom cabinets and Trolley suitcases. And in case you’re wondering where the name came from, ‘Jerry’ was the slang word used by the British and American armed forces for the Germans during World War II. The can’s original name was ‘Whermacht-Einheitskanister’ , meaning armed forces unit canister and was designed to hold fuel. Article 22 Article 22 partners with artisans in off-the-beaten-track places to create modern jewellery with provenance. Their first collection, Peacebomb is jewellery handcrafted in Laos from Vietnam War shrapnel. Each piece gives back to support traditional Laotian artisan livelihoods, village development, community endeavours and contributes to the Mines Advisory Group …