Month: February 2017

Concrete planters with copper foil by Amelayna Designs

Interview: Maree Petrousis | Amelayna Designs

Melbourne-based Maree Petrousis has achieved what many dream of: turning a hobby into a business. And it all started, as so often happens, after making concrete planters for herself and then for friends and family. What’s more, she’s hit on a trend that doesn’t seem to be waning. Concrete is still a popular choice for kitchen bench tops, table tops and accessories. Here, Maree talks a little about her creative life … Tell us a bit about yourself. When and why did you begin exploring with the concrete? My name is Maree. I’m a wife and mum of two little girls. My background is in retail, makeup artistry and now I’m working full-time in the banking industry. I started experimenting with concrete four years ago, which was a little after I had my first child. It was as a hobby and a means to delve back into my creative side. Since then, I have worked hard to create a brand [Amelayna Designs] that is unique, high in quality and affordable and appealing to people who …

Interview: Kelly White | Vintage Collector

Meet Kelly White, who collects everything from vintage handmade to vintage homespun with battery rescue hens in between. Words by Meryl Hancock, photographs by Ken Brass. You could be forgiven for thinking it’s a blonde Shirley Temple who answers the front door of a brick cottage in the Sydney suburb of Kyeemagh. Bold ringlets, a vintage print dress with a delicately scalloped neckline, perfectly coordinated clogs and an adorable smile greet Australian Country. Oh, and the exuberance of youth. I’m waiting for the improvised tap dance. Instead Kelly White motions us into her hallway and my eyeballs start to swivel. The show begins with a wall of vintage plates to the left, a vivid shower of retro skirts to the right and two sociable chooks that keep bobbing in and out of the frame. It is captivating and we’ve only seen a snippet. Growing up surrounded by treasures, such as her great grandfather’s paintings and her mother’s antique and contemporary quilts, Kelly has continued a collecting tradition. The house is brimming with history as it was …

Interview: NZ designers | George and Willy

We love a feel-good story of childhood friends who end up working together because they share the same passions. New Zealand designers and makers George Wilkins and Will McCallum have done just that and judging by their after-hours fishing and rafting trips and the helicopter spotting game they created, their friendship certainly doesn’t seem to have suffered. The founders of George and Willy design, make and produce quality handmade goods – all things they wanted or needed themselves. It’s the process of making and creating that spurs them on. As they say on their blog: ‘We love making stuff … it is our passion and it continues well after the working day is done. Many after-work hours are spent here in the workshop, creating and bringing to life personal projects we all get excited about.’ And here at Who’d Have Thought, we’re thrilled to be featuring one of their products, the Studio Roller in the store! The idea for it came from a roll of kraft paper, which developed into a simple wall-mounted bracket to hold the paper so that it …

Interview: Craig Robson | Carousel Collector

Meet the modern day Scarlet Pimpernel – Craig Robson, who has been riding a carousel of adventure across many decades. Words by Meryl Hancock, photography by Ken Brass. Behind a simple door to an unobtrusive warehouse in the Sydney suburb of Mascot lurks a giant fairground masterfully disguised. Dance hall organs of unfathomable proportion sit poised to perform, Grecian busts grace dark corners, fairy lights wink, and a raucous chorus of, How much is that doggy in the window? bursts from a spinning carousel. The rendition is bold and jaunty and conjures memories of riding in circles, waving gaily at parents and onlookers, and not wanting to get off. The fun facilitator appears, waistcoated showman Craig Robson. “I collect three things – mechanical musical instruments, a bit of steam and a lot of dust,” he announces, a humble introduction to what is a grand-scale collection showcasing fine music production, musical arrangement, carving and engineering from the 1850s through to the 1950s. “I started off playing the piano, then realised that mechanical music sounded so much better,” …