All posts tagged: art

Interview: Daniele Barresi | Carving Designer

Today’s interviewee is a true ‘who’d have thought-er’! Italian-born-Sydney-based Daniele Barresi not only carves food for a living, he turns it into works of art. The insides of a humble pumpkin becomes an intricately sculpted work. An avocado – no longer useful only to ‘smash’ on toast – is carved and cut into a delicate work of art. Broccoli, watermelon, zucchinis, pears. Even soap. From fisherman to chef, Daniele – at only 26-years-old – has literally carved a niche for himself and has formed a huge following for his in-demand works. Come and find out what happens when he ‘leaves his mind flying’ … Tell us about yourself – who are you, what’s is your background? Hello, I am Daniele Barresi. I am 26 years old, originating from Italy. I am a carving designer. At the age of 14, I started working as a fisherman for my family’s company. But this was not my passion and that was why I started studying at cooking school. When and why did you begin exploring with carving? I …

Art Love

French novelist Marcel Proust once said, “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes”. This is so true for art. Artists interpret the world with new eyes thereby giving us new eyes with which to see the world. Check out these four artists who, using different mediums, create new worlds out of our world. From top left to right: French artist Karine Jollet constructs body parts using pieces of old bed sheets and shirts, embroidered handkerchiefs and second-hand fabrics. Called ‘Soft Sculptures’ the works are all done in white and are perfectly anatomical, designed she says to “remind us of an invisible universe, far away from our own world, a dimension of unity and purity”. Found at Creative Boom. Japanese artist Kota Yamaji turns the world into a heady mix of rainbow-coloured surrealism with his pop art series of 3D digital illustrations. It’s colourful, mad and a little bit creepy (the image shown here is rather tame, I might add!). Found at Creative Boom. LA-based photographer and filmmaker Niaz Uddin …

Wearable Art | Thirty Years of wacky

What would happen if art was ripped off the wall and thrown onto a human body? We all love a dress-up but there’s something thrilling and amusing about the World of Wearable Art and the international competition staged in my home town Wellington, New Zealand each year. It’s as if the concept of haute couture is poked, prodded and flipped on its head (or rammed where the sun don’t shine). Designers from the worlds of architecture, art, theatre, jewellery making, textile and industrial crafting are united by the challenge to construct without commercial constraint. The results are no less than inspirational. The opportunity for innovation and invention is irresistible to an enormous band of entrants worldwide. The show-and-tell takes place on a giant runway amid an extravagant lighting and sound display, overall it’s not too far removed from catwalk, but the outfits are seriously ingenious. The rest of Wellington rejoices and retail outlets show their support by proudly displaying entries in shop frontages, plus a few premium entries make the foyer of the world renowned Te Papa Museum on the Wellington foreshore. In Aotearoa, the competition has become an institution and this …

Environmental Artists | Nature meets waste

At WHT we love nothing more than artists who can produce sensational bodies of work using naturally occurring materials or even waste products such as plastic bottles, ocean detritus and outmoded CDs as their primary resource. American stick work artist Patrick Dougherty studied hospital and health administration before returning to North Carolina University to complete a degree in art history and sculpture. Using carpentry skills, he began exploring tree saplings as a sculptural material. Starting with single trees, his work soon evolved to a monumental scale and over the past 30 years, Dougherty has produced more than 250 giant scale artworks and become internationally acclaimed. Two beached fish on Botafogo beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil were the marketing tool chosen to promote the UN Conference on Sustainable Development at the Rio+20 in 2012. Made entirely from plastic bottles, the enormous installations were backlit at night to create a vivid light display. Scheduled 20 years on from the original Earth summit in 1992, Rio+20 was “a chance to move away from business-as-usual and to act to end …