All posts tagged: environment

4 Eco-Kayaking Destinations

With winter yet to make an appearance in Sydney and the ocean temperature still bearable sans wetsuit, it’s prime time for nature spotting from a kayak. Last week our resident turtle popped up to greet us, and a few whales are long overdue a visit to the harbour with migration season almost here. There’s a magic in observing from a slightly wobbly and exposed vantage point and in leaving no footprint, and I’ve become curious about other opportunities in the world for this type of adventure. There are so many to choose from but here are four of my top picks. Orca Camp in British Colombia, Canada with Wildcoast Adventures Northside of Vancouver Island in Johnstone Strait is an oceanside glamping spot to die for. Orca Camp is all about environment and wilderness. For a week you can live next-door to a killer whale sanctuary. A beachside shower and wood-fired cedar spa pool are ideal bookends to a day spent on the water observing Orcas, dolphins and porpoises in their natural habitat. Fjord of Jostedalsbreen …

Interview: Sophie Carnell | Jeweller and Artist

Sophie Carnell is a jewellery maker and artist living and working on Bruny Island, Tasmania, Asutralia who only embarked on a Fine Arts degree in her late thirties and silver smithing fairly recently. She’s the perfect example of how it’s never too late to start a creative practice! Fascinated by history, the landscape and our connection with the environment, Sophie explores these ideas, often using recycled, upcycled and collected materials in her work that combines jewellery and art and art with jewellery. Read on to learn more … Please introduce yourself. Tell us about your background and how you’ve got to where you are today. I was born in England and lived there until I was twenty, growing up in the picturesque Cotswolds and rambling free around the countryside as a child. I also lived on a little island off the South West Coast of Ireland. That forever instilled in my heart a love of storm blue oceans, lowering skies, dizzying clifftops and wild coastlines. When I came to Australia I lived for ten years …

Wearable Art | Thirty Years of wacky

What would happen if art was ripped off the wall and thrown onto a human body? We all love a dress-up but there’s something thrilling and amusing about the World of Wearable Art and the international competition staged in my home town Wellington, New Zealand each year. It’s as if the concept of haute couture is poked, prodded and flipped on its head (or rammed where the sun don’t shine). Designers from the worlds of architecture, art, theatre, jewellery making, textile and industrial crafting are united by the challenge to construct without commercial constraint. The results are no less than inspirational. The opportunity for innovation and invention is irresistible to an enormous band of entrants worldwide. The show-and-tell takes place on a giant runway amid an extravagant lighting and sound display, overall it’s not too far removed from catwalk, but the outfits are seriously ingenious. The rest of Wellington rejoices and retail outlets show their support by proudly displaying entries in shop frontages, plus a few premium entries make the foyer of the world renowned Te Papa Museum on the Wellington foreshore. In Aotearoa, the competition has become an institution and this …

Environmental Artists | Nature meets waste

At WHT we love nothing more than artists who can produce sensational bodies of work using naturally occurring materials or even waste products such as plastic bottles, ocean detritus and outmoded CDs as their primary resource. American stick work artist Patrick Dougherty studied hospital and health administration before returning to North Carolina University to complete a degree in art history and sculpture. Using carpentry skills, he began exploring tree saplings as a sculptural material. Starting with single trees, his work soon evolved to a monumental scale and over the past 30 years, Dougherty has produced more than 250 giant scale artworks and become internationally acclaimed. Two beached fish on Botafogo beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil were the marketing tool chosen to promote the UN Conference on Sustainable Development at the Rio+20 in 2012. Made entirely from plastic bottles, the enormous installations were backlit at night to create a vivid light display. Scheduled 20 years on from the original Earth summit in 1992, Rio+20 was “a chance to move away from business-as-usual and to act to end …